• March 13, 2019

DCBA’s Wage Enforcement Program Recognized by County Board for Enforcement Efforts Resulting in Hundreds of Thousands of Dollars in Back Wages

DCBA’s Wage Enforcement Program Recognized by County Board for Enforcement Efforts Resulting in Hundreds of Thousands of Dollars in Back Wages

DCBA’s Wage Enforcement Program Recognized by County Board for Enforcement Efforts Resulting in Hundreds of Thousands of Dollars in Back Wages 1024 536 Consumer & Business

The County of Los Angeles Department of Consumer and Business Affairs’ (DCBA) Wage Enforcement Program continues to promote a fair marketplace for hard-working employees and upstanding businesses in Los Angeles County.

On March 12, 2019, DCBA was recognized by the County’s Board of Supervisors for their efforts in enforcing the County’s and the City of Santa Monica’s minimum wage ordinances. Through a partnership with the Santa Monica City Attorney’s office, enforcement efforts have resulted in the prosecutions of two hotel gift shops, a major hotel, and a janitorial company.

“Wage enforcement is an important issue for County residents, especially for people who work in industries prone to wage theft,” said LA County Supervisor Hilda L. Solis, who also served as Secretary of Labor under President Obama. “As a result of the Board’s approval of my 2016 motion, in which the Board of Supervisors prioritized enforcement of wage violations, we have made a big impact. The implementation of the Wage Enforcement Program, which could not be possible without the partnership of the LA County Workplace Justice Collaborative and the City of Santa Monica, has resulted in over 6,000 inquiries. We have helped over 1,300 employees collect more than $200,000 in back wages. I look forward to continuing our partnerships in order to help workers earn their fair share and help businesses come into compliance.”

“L.A. County, under the leadership of DCBA, has gotten so good at minimum wage enforcement that other cities have asked us to help them. In my (Third Supervisorial) District, one of those cities is Santa Monica,” said Supervisor Sheila Kuehl. “I want to commend DCBA’s team for their outstanding work helping my district enforce the minimum wage ordinance and ensure that a hard day’s work is rewarded with a fair day’s pay.”

DCBA’s Wage Enforcement Program succeeds through its collective efforts across the entire County. DCBA partners with city governments and the L.A. County Workplace Justice Collaborative to ensure both employees and employers are educated about the wage ordinances that affect them. “Indeed, it does take a village,” said Supervisor Hilda Solis.

“The wage enforcement program staff responded to over 6,000 inquiries regarding not only the requirements of the County’s minimum wage ordinance, but also regarding all applicable wage and hour issues. This indeed is incredible work.”

Proper education and compliance resources are particularly valuable for businesses. Employers who do not pay workers a legal wage can unfairly undercut their law-abiding competitors.

“Obviously wage theft is not fair to workers. It’s also not fair to businesses that are following all the rules,” said Joseph M. Nicchitta, Director of the Department of Consumer and Business Affairs. “They are undercutting their competition, and that’s why education and enforcement of the minimum wage law are so critical. We’re grateful for our partners and the City of Santa Monica for allowing us to help their workers recover back wages.”

For more information about DCBA’s Wage Enforcement Program and how it can help your community’s workers and businesses, visit dcba.lacounty.gov/minimum-wage.

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